Month: May 2015

What I Read Wednesday – The Friendship of Mortals by Audrey Driscoll

I was doing one of those google yourself (and your book) checks, and was happily surprised to find this review of the first book of the Herbert West Series.

A Writer Cooks

The Friendship of Mortals

I found this as a free Nook book. I love discovering (well written) free books by unknown authors.

The Friendship of Mortals is about a librarian (instant draw for me), Charles Milburn, who becomes friends with a medical student, Herbert West, when West asks to view the famed Necronomicon. From that moment as they look at it together, their lives are linked forever.

West finds in Milburn a trusted friend and helpful assistant for his experiments: trying to revive the dead. Milburn, someone who is very predictable and stable, is drawn to West as someone who is exciting and possibly unstable. Despite their differences and arguments, West knows that Milburn will come to his aid whenever he calls.

Through experiments, lovers, careers, even war, the pair keep in touch for over ten years. When West asks for one last favor, the ultimate favor, Milburn cannot say no. The ending is somewhat…

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The Shoe Bird

Birds nest in various spots in my garden. House sparrows, of course — last year they moved into a long-disused birdhouse attached to the garage, and have been very busy producing more sparrows. I have found three bushtit nests in recent years. The latest one was in a ceanothus right next to the front walk. Sadly, something (probably a crow) yanked it out recently. I found the nest (a small work of art made of lichens, spider silk, dryer lint, grasses and feathers) lying on the street, under a power line where the crow probably took and dropped it. I hope the nest was unoccupied at the time.

And now we have the Shoe Bird! My preferred footwear in the garden is a pair of Duck Shoes — cheap rubber shoes that slip on and off easily. Until the advent of Nelly the Newf, I used to kick them off on the back porch, but since Nelly likes to chew shoes, I resorted to parking the duck shoes on a beam that holds up the porch roof.

A couple of weeks ago, I found an amazing lot of plant material (dried moss and grass) stuffed into both shoes. Since I’d worn them the day before, I was quite surprised. The creature responsible turned out to be a Bewick’s wren. Once I observed it stuffing the shoes, I removed the current ones and put them inside, replacing them with a worn out pair I hadn’t gotten around to disposing of. I made sure to put all the nest material into the replacement shoes. The bird didn’t seem to notice, just got on with nest-building.

I have no idea whether it’s intending to hatch out a brood of tiny wrens in the shoe. Wikipedia says Bewick’s wren males sometimes build “dummy nests,” hoping to attract females to take over and finish the job. (Hmm. No comment; we’re talking about birds). Maybe that’s what’s going on here. I don’t know, but in the meantime, the bird is an interesting addition to the scene.

Shoe Bird 1

Shoe Bird 2

Shoe Bird 3

And, just because it’s so gorgeous, here is the second flower to bloom on clematis “Pink Fantasy.”

May 24, 2015

Buds and Anticipation

Anticipation is one of the great pleasures of gardening. You plant, water, feed, weed and hover. You watch the little plant grow under your care. One day — it has buds! Already a reward for your efforts. Watching them swell, and develop colour, and begin to open — I find this almost better than the period of full bloom. It’s like the excitement you feel before going on a vacation; experiences yet-to-be-experienced are perfect and unbroken, without disappointments and, of course, the inevitable aftermath (returning to home and work, or fading and deadheading).

So far this spring, quite a few plants have budded, bloomed and faded already in my garden. Some, such as snowdrops, crocuses and tulips, are now dormant. Lilacs, fragrant and beautiful just a few weeks ago, are now entering the ugly brown stage and becoming an item for the Unpleasant Things To Do list, because clipping off the faded blooms is a tedious job done from a ladder.

But there are buds, hundreds of them, maybe thousands, such as those on this extremely tough, dependable rose growing into a Norway maple. (You can see a bit of a browned-off lilac bloom on the left).

May 18, 2015

Clematis “Pink Fantasy” has lots of promising buds this year.

May 18, 2015

Nearby are delphiniums and snapdragons, both in bud, with pink snapdragons already blooming in the background.

May 18, 2015

I like lamb’s ears (Stachys byzantia) best just before they bloom. They start to look tired once a few of the small flowers fade, although they do go on blooming for weeks, and the bees love them. Right now they are exquisitely velvety.

May 18, 2015

Mulleins do a great job preparing to bloom. You just know something big is coming, like the long crescendo in Respihghi’s “The Pines of the Appian Way,” a great buildup to a magnificent flourish. They also bloom a long time and are popular with bees.

White mullein, Verbascum chaixii

White mullein, Verbascum chaixii

 

Great big mullein, Verbascum olympicum

Great big mullein, Verbascum olympicum

Rose campion, Lychnis coronaria, is indecently happy in this garden. Here is one of many plants, developing dozens of buds that will soon be magenta or white flowers, next to an already blooming Dutch iris. (Note the wire fences around the perennial beds, and the rather large dead patch in the lawn — both due to the presence of Nelly the Newf, the canine member of the household).

May 18, 2015

Finally, some actual blooms…

Helianthemum nummularium

Helianthemum nummularium

And now, back to bee-watching.

Small bumblebee in Ceanothus.

Small bumblebee in Ceanothus.

#Authors – Especially #Indies – Please Note…

Indie authors! Here is a valuable resource for you, thanks to Chris the Story Reading Ape!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

YOU are invited to take advantage of the following:

Thanks to all my blog contributors, followers and visitors since The Story Reading Ape Blog began in April 2013 (just over two years ago), the posts have received a total of over250,000 views (increasing daily).

The breakdown of statistics are as follows:

Number of views in 2013: 30,412

Number of views in 2014: 125,910

Number of views in 2015: over 93,000 so far

Current number of views per day: Between 700 and 1200.

Current number of followers: over 7,45

So, if YOU would like to boost YOUR blog traffic, following and promote your books – FOR FREE – why not do one of the following:

NEW Authors:

Overcome your shyness and send me YOUR Guest Author article to introduce yourselfclick HERE to see what is required.

EXISTING…

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Local Author Book Review #2: The White Limousine by John R. Paterson

Time travel. Second chances. A lost love and a new love. These are the compelling elements of The White Limousine, a science fiction romance by Victoria author John Paterson.

screen-shot-2014-07-18-at-3-21-21-pm1

The plot revolves around two couples: Lisa is part of a genius team that creates the world’s first working time machine, and Eddie is an adventurer who takes a job as a very special kind of chauffeur. They give Fred a chance to fix the worst mistakes of his life, the biggest of which is losing his true love, Kimberley. But things go wrong.

The white limo of the title, which reads like something designed by Elon Musk with help from James Bond’s “Q,” is the vehicle that whisks the characters from 2014 into the past. Complications arise when the limo returns empty except for bloodstains, and Lisa becomes part of her own experiment. From that point two stories unfold, one in 1950 and the other in 1985.

Science definitely takes a back seat to romance here. Paterson offers just enough scientific-sounding information to maintain plausibility, but keeps the focus on the characters’ emotions and their relationships with one another. Underlying the story line of The White Limousine is a sincere concern with values and ethics, which manifests in a lurid subplot involving a rather bizarre church. A car chase right out of the movies concludes this episode. Even though some details strain credibility, the story is engaging enough to ride smoothly over these bumps.

I noted a few problems with editing: inconsistency with the surname of one of the principal characters and frequent instances of missing or misplaced quotation marks that make it difficult to tell who is speaking when.

It’s tempting to compare this book to Stephen King’s 11/22/63, since they share the premise that time travel is possible, and both feature characters that fall in love while visiting the mid-2oth century. King, true to form, takes the shadowed side of the road, while Paterson mostly sticks to the sunshine and takes the reader on an entertaining excursion.

My rating: 7 out of 10 stars.

The White Limousine is available at the author’s website, and one copy is in the Emerging Local Authors collection at the Greater Victoria Public Library.

 

 

Indie Novels Are Like Organic Apples

Here is an analogy that is close to my heart. Indie novels as organic creations, not sanitized “products.”

Nothing Gilded, Nothing Gained-Period Drama on Paper at Middlemay Farm

Gentlemen Harvesting Hops and Stories Gentlemen Harvesting Hops and Stories

Wednesdays at the CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) farm where I worked were packing days when no matter the weather or the raspberries left rotting on the bush, we met in the cool, dark room to sort and pack pesticide-free, non-migrant labor harvested produce to be delivered to starry-eyed customersin the morning.

Our Harvard-educated, Russian-Lit major boss told us not to worry too much about dirty garlic as the customers were customers because they wanted to feel part of the farm-to-table process.

new camera 083Some customers visited the 200-year-old farm to see up close the dirty business of nutrition. They gazed in wonder at the strawberry fields alive with jewel-toned fruit only a day or two away from collapse and decay. They enjoyed getting pricked by the thistles as they reached for a berry and tossed the juicy, warm fruit into their mouths. Misshaped berries…

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One Perfect Poppy

I have often grumbled about the difficulties of growing blue poppies (Meconopsis species). Over the past 20 years I have grown numbers of plants from seed obtained from two plants I bought — Meconopsis betonicifolia and Meconopsis x sheldonii ‘Lingholm.’ Most of my plants now are seedlings of Lingholm; all traces of M. betonicifolia have vanished from my place.

On two occasions in those 20 years I have had spectacular success (in a relative sense, of course) with my blue poppies. In May 2000 I had seven plants blooming well in a small rectangular bed. I did not take any pictures, expecting a repeat performance. Ha. In 2013, after working hard at producing more seedlings and preparing a bed for them near a large magnolia, I had 7 or 8 plants in bloom, This time I did take pictures, but because the bed was long and skinny — crescent-shaped, in fact — the effect was not as wonderful as when the flowers were massed together in a smaller space.

This year, I have one plant in bloom. Only one, but I have made sure to take pictures of both blooms.

April 19, 2015

This was the first one. As it faded, the second bud began to open.

001Fully open, it proved to be a much better flower than its predecessor.

003That colour! The ethereal texture of the petals! Definitely worth the trouble.

I hope to obtain some seeds from these two flowers, to plant next January or February.