Blue hyacinths

Spring Sights 2020

To my surprise, I forgot to schedule the post I had intended for today (March 22nd). I’ll schedule it for next week, and in the meantime, here are some photos from my garden taken on the first day of spring.

Rhubarb emerging
Rhubarb leaves. Wrinkly when young, smoothing out as they mature.
Erythronium oregonum, Fawn lily
Fawn lily (Erythronium oregonum) and Chionodoxa lucilae
Daffodil, white and yellow
Daffodil (variety unknown)
Sedge, Carex and garden ornament
Huge clump of sedge (Carex morrowii) and garden ornament
Hellebore "Ruby Wine"
Hellebore “Ruby Wine”
Hellebore, white with purple spots
This hellebore was a nice surprise. It’s a seedling from one of my old plants, which are mostly pink and purple.

I was about to say something about the garden being a welcome diversion in these days of staying at home and “social distancing,” but that would be inaccurate. The truth is I prefer messing about in the garden to most kinds of socializing.

Fellow bloggers, how are you coping with whatever virus-avoiding situation you’re in? Are you reading, watching, or maybe even writing? Is anyone getting bored?

48 comments

    1. I rarely get bored and being alone doesn’t bother me. (Of course I’m not alone much these days, with my husband and Nelly the Newfoundland dog on the premises.) It has occurred to me lately that introverts might be in their element right now. Thanks for your thoughts, Priscilla!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Michael. They do quite well here. I started out with one white one and half a dozen mystery seedlings that turned out to be dark pink and purple. The one I called a surprise must have been a cross done by bees. I also bought plants of three named varieties last spring. I hope your hellebores bloom well!

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Lorinda! I did read your thoughtful and thorough review of Vokhtah on Goodreads. I was looking forward to it, thinking that as an author of books featuring non-human ILFs you would have a different perspective. I have been wondering if the harsh parts of Vokhtah are mitigated by the fact that the characters aren’t humans. It was certainly a mind-broadening read.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I tend to give my non-human ILFs humanlike traits like compassion and empathy and a moral and ethical sense. Makes them more relatable and more fun. The Vokh seem to have no sense of humor, unlike my Birds and my Termites. Of course, if I had to breed the way they do, I don’t think I’d have a sense of humor either!

        Liked by 2 people

        1. Yes, your Termites are much more congenial types. I have to say, the idea of insects the size of large dogs gave me the shudders when I read The Termite Queen, because the point of view there was a human one. But in the Ki’shto’ba books, there are really no humans, so as a reader I became a Termite, which was perfectly okay. The process of reading is complex and interesting.

          Liked by 2 people

          1. If you read the reviews of the Ki’shto’ba series, you’ll note a lot of people expressed amazement that they could weep for a big insect. Also, one person commented that he didn’t really think of them as insects but simply as humans with odd body configurations.

            Liked by 2 people

            1. True, but you avoided anthropomorphizing them by representing their anatomy and physiology acccurately (well, similar to terrestrial termites, of course). So many children’s books feature animals wearing clothes and doing human things. Kenneth Grahame’s The Wind in the Willows is one of my sentimental favourites, but those characters weren’t animals at all, but Edwardian gentlemen!

              Liked by 2 people

  1. Thanks for the pictures! I love rhubarb leaves. No, I’m not bored. I grew up on a homestead in the north and we were locked in for six months of winter. I took my schooling by correspondence. That’s called “distance learning” now. I’m writing, and that includes a new novel, some short stories and articles for my blog. And reading. And phoning or emailing friends. And working on my usual 2 or 3 online courses! Bored? Never!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Thanks for sharing your garden with us Audrey, some truly beautiful sites.
    I very rarely get bored….everything else but boredom I remember the sensation- twice: once in 1984 & once in 2010; my mind is too frenetic- not necessarily a good thing.
    I need to spend more time negotiating with our garden.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Thanks for the delightful photographs of your garden flowers, Audrey.
    No, certainly not bored, as long as I have my ‘garden’ of words…(Otherwise, it’s a partly paved Spanish garden, palm tree, and patio pots of cyclamen, various hardy greens and a hedge of vivid pink/fushia Bougainvillea. It’s like a ghost-town. Very strictly applied self-isolation with husband. One person per car and out walking or walking the dog…(unlike the UK.) ALL cafes, restaurants and meeting places firmly closed. Hopefully, an antidote will soon be found. Take care. Cheers. x

    Liked by 2 people

    1. We do live in strange times. Grocery stores admit only so many people at a time. Once inside, we end up doing funny little dances to avoid getting closer than 6 feet to anyone else. It’s sad (and terrible for the proprietors) to have all cafes and restaurants closed. It does sound like governments are stepping up to provide emergency funds. I agree — a vaccine or cure can’t come too soon! Thanks for your thoughts, Joy!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I love the pictures. You live in my favorite part of Canada (and if the Chief Narcissist gets a second term) maybe the next place I’ll move to. 🙂 Just the buckup I need on a foggy, chilly day in Central VA.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It is a pleasant place to live (although pricey). And there is always the threat of the Big One (earthquake), as there is in California and the Pac NW too, of course. Can’t complain about the weather most of the time, though!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Beautiful garden. We’re still busy pulling weeds.
    Not bored. I’m reading 2 books, teaching my grandson photography, keeping up with writing. I’ve been documenting life in a covid world.
    There are a couple of projects to work on, one being a stone planter.
    Stay well.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. First the hyacinths. Then rhubarb. Then the lovely daffodil variety. And the sedge. And the hellebores. My blood pressure lowered and my happiness increased with each photo. Thank you for sharing these glimpses of your garden! The crocus in my front yard are blossoming — and today I saw bees for the first time (visiting the crocus flowers)! Hurrah for spring arriving — apparently unaffected by/unconcerned with COVID-19. A lovely reminder that life goes on…

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Your lovely garden reminds me of how beautiful spring is! Too bad we’re stuck indoors but I’m sure you’re experiencing full spring in your garden.

    So so beautiful.

    citygirlsdance.wordpress.com

    Liked by 1 person

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