Reblogs

The Dime Is Here!

Mark Paxson’s latest novel is a gripping story of three young people who must deal with their personal demons while becoming a family. Read my Goodreads review here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/4093864873

KingMidget's Ramblings

Years in the making, months in the editing, months in the formatting, and a whole bunch of dead brain cells … The Dime is now live on Amazon in e-book form or paperback. Go buy yourself a copy. Buy some for your friends. They make great stocking stuffers. Door stops even. Who knows, you might actually like the book. Here’s what the first reviewer has to say:

Although The Dime centers around the lives of three young people (two teenagers and a young adult), it transcends a typical YA novel in that the characters are dealing with real-life issues (parental death, disability, abuse) that go well beyond typical teenage angst. This makes it relatable to all, especially since Paxson’s evocative writing stirs feelings and emotions in the reader that rise above the story itself.

The three main characters are fully dimensional and the storytelling rich. Even The Dime’s old owner, Mr…

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New rules

For all that I love arguing with rules for writers, here are some worthy suggestions from author Kevin Brennan, along with others from artist Richard Diebenkorn.

WHAT THE HELL

Artist Richard Diebenkorn had some rules about the way he should approach his work. I can’t remember where I got these, but I was inspired enough to copy and paste them at the time. I was also inspired enough to come up with a few of my own. When the going gets tough, it’s always good to have some reliable aphorisms you can fall back on.

Diebenkorn’s: 

1. Attempt what is not certain. Certainty may or may not come later. It may then be a valuable delusion.

2. The pretty, initial position which falls short of completeness is not to be valued—except as a stimulus for further moves.

3. DO search.

4. Use and respond to the initial fresh qualities but consider them absolutely expendable.

5. Don’t “discover” a subject—of any kind.

6. Somehow don’t be bored but if you must, use it in action. Use its destructive potential.

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Words related to writing

Visualizing Your Characters and Reviewing Other Authors: Two More from WSW

Two more posts on the Writers Supporting Writers blog: Chuck Litka’s thoughts on how we picture the characters we create can be found HERE

And HERE, another video chat, this time on the benefits and pitfalls of reviewing and being reviewed by other authors.

Image by prettysleepy1 on Pixabay