Reblogs

3 Reasons Why You Need to Finish Your Writing Project

At the 2/3 point through a first draft that’s getting to be a tough slog I found this inspiring. Writers, read this before you think about quitting!

Knowledge is Power

Have you ever wondered why starting a project can be so full of ideas, motivation, focus, and commitment, only to later on land into an overwhelming state of pressure, agonizing middle, and a completely dispirited end? This scenario occurs more often than not, and am moved to refer to it as the curse of the writer.

Stumbling blocks characterize almost all writing projects, so badly in some situations that they completely disorient what was once a comprehensive research, sleepless nights, sincere effort, and immense sacrifice, just to name a few. Ranging from lack of time, family issues, writers block, running out of ideas to fear of rejection, stumbling blocks can easily lead to an incomplete and stagnated end.

Every writer’s desire is to start writing a book or an article, and most importantly to finish it. Here are 3 reasons that should make you reconsider completing your project.

  1. You Owe…

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Guest Author: Audrey Driscoll – Weird rabbits…

Sue Vincent invited me to contribute a post to her estimable blog, so I wrote this.

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

A while ago it occurred to me that when humans become extinct, unless aliens arrive on Earth to dig up and appreciate our music, art and writing, it will become meaningless. The animals that survive our presence on this planet will never read our books, sing our songs or admire our creations, even though vines may festoon our sculptures and birds nest among their twining stems.

Culture, I thought, is unique to us. Then, for some reason, I remembered those weird rabbits.

What rabbits?

Near the end of Part I of the late Richard Adams’s wonderful book, Watership Down, the band of homeless rabbits comes across a warren whose inhabitants display peculiar behaviours. They practice complicated etiquette, recite poetry and make things they call Shapes by pushing pebbles into burrow walls. It turns out this warren is managed by a nearby farmer. He protects it from predators and delivers…

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Read an E-book Week (2)

Read an Ebook Week continues at Smashwords through Saturday. Here Edeana Malcolm tells Kindle owners how to load Smashwords books. Don’t miss out on all the great books available (including Edeana’s and mine).

My Writing Eden

How to download a Smashwords book to a Kindle reader

Don’t be held captive by Amazon. Sure it’s more convenient to buy e-books direct from Amazon, but this week you can get some really good book deals at Smashwords. For some reason, Amazon won’t take books from Smashwords. They prefer exclusivity, so writers have to publish directly.

Don’t worry. You can still benefit from the Smashwords promotion. As I promised yesterday, here are the instructions on how to download a Smashwords book to your Kindle or Kindle Fire.

First find the book you want at Smashwords at https://www.smashwords.com

How do I download books to my Kindle or Kindle Fire?
You’ll find links to all your purchased books in your Smashwords Library. There are two options for loading Smashwords ebook content to your Kindle or Kindle Fire:

1.  USB Connection.  Plug your Kindle into the USB slot (small rectangular slot)…

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¡Fascination is live on Amazon!

Given the turmoil and angst-inducing events in the world (you know what I mean!) this is a perfect time to escape into a better world by reading Kevin Brennan’s delightful novel, Fascination. It’s now available on Amazon.

WHAT THE HELL

cover-smallClick me, s’il vous plaît!

Yesterday, with no fanfare whatsoever, I published Fascination on Amazon.

I know. Unexpected, right?

You can probably guess why I did it. Two main reasons: One, that after an initial blast of sales to, pretty much (no, exclusively), people who read this blog, I couldn’t give away a copy. There was no follow-up, no word of mouth, and though a number of potential readers expressed interest via comments on reviews of the book on other blogs, none of them pulled the trigger. Two, aside from the blog and Twitter, there’s no way to market the thing. I knew this going in, of course, but I’d hoped that Janey would tell Jenny and Jenny would buy it and then tell Jackie, who’d buy it herself and then tell Jill. It’s #guerrillapublishing, right? The word spreads and strangers start showing up. Six degrees of separation.

Just…

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In Themes Of War…

There’s such a lot of substance in this post — poetry by Vita Sackville-West, and thoughts on preserving mementos of the garden through the winter. And a nice surprise at the end!

Miss Sissinghurst

Honour the gardener!  that patient man
Who from his schooldays follows up his calling,
Starting so modestly, a little boy
Red-nosed, red-fingered, doing what he’s told,
Not knowing what he does or why he does it,
Having no concept of the larger plan.
But gradually, (if the love be there,
Irrational as any passion, strong,)
Enlarging vision slowly turns the key
And swings the door wide open on the long
Vistas of true significance.

-Vita Sackville-West
The Garden; 1946

I love Vita’s poetry.  It took me awhile to like poetry and even still sometimes it’s hard for me to understand.  I think in order to love poetry one must know the author and the times in which they wrote.  Vita loved her garden.  Her compilation of poems The Garden cover all four seasons.  However, there is one recurring theme which trickles in every now and then.  It is that of the…

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#BadMoonRising Day 14 The Friendship of Mortals by Audrey Driscoll #IndieAuthor #thriller #horror

I joined a stellar group of authors on Teri Polen’s blog this month, talking about our horror/supernatural themed books. Have a look at the other authors featured; your TBR piles are sure to grow!

Books and Such

bmr

Today we welcome Audrey Driscoll to Bad Moon Rising!  Lovecraft fans will have a special interest in her book – and what’s even better is there are three more in this series!

The Friendship of Mortals ebook is currently FREE on Amazon and Smashwords!

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Arkham, Massachusetts, 1910. Charles Milburn, a cataloguer in the Library of Miskatonic University, meets Herbert West, a medical student with compromised credentials.

Herbert West can restore the dead to life, he says, and he persuades Charles to be his assistant. Their secret experiments achieve success, but with a taint of disaster. Charles finds himself caught between the demands of his fascinating friend and his growing attraction to Alma Halsey, daughter of the Dean of Medicine.

In 1914 West joins the Canadian Army as a medical officer to pursue his grisly research on the battlefields of France. His letters to Charles reveal a disturbing mixture of cynicism and black humour. Left behind in Arkham…

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Thinking Fiction: Fighting in Fiction

Here is a useful post about shoot-outs in fiction, something many of us try to pull off with limited or no experience and a bit of research.

An American Editor

by Carolyn Haley

I edit a lot of genre novels, and many of them include funny fighting. Not the ha-ha kind of funny, but the eye-rolling, groaning kind of funny caused by absurd or impossible situations. I believe some authors create such scenes because they have lived secure, nonviolent lives, and gained their impressions of battle from media. Young writers, in particular, are prone to composing fight and chase scenes that come across like video games. But young or old, many authors’ combat scenes show either a lack of direct experience or a failure to do research. As a result, the ordinary heroes they strive so hard to make human and believable suddenly become idiots or superheroes when faced with violence.

Editors sometimes allow fighting bloopers to pass unchallenged because they, too, have led secure, nonviolent lives. Editing is a desk job, and the types of people drawn to it…

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Re #guerrillapublishing

Here are some thoughts on #guerrillapublishing by the creative Kevin Brennan. And BTW, consider buying his latest book, Fascination. I did!

WHAT THE HELL

gorilla-610457_640 It behooves you to buy Fascination

One reason I decided to “publish” Fascination in this unorthodox way (selling it via my blog instead of Amazon) was to ask the question, “What is it to ‘publish’ anyway?” On the most basic level, it’s simply to “make available” or “distribute.” You can add “to sell at market,” I suppose, but technically no money has to change hands in a publishing arrangement with readers, as we indies show all the time with our giveaways.

It seems like that’s not quite enough to hang a hat on, though, since publishing seems to mean documenting a book, registering it, and making it searchable in subject categories, i.e., findable. Yet, there are so many indie books out there now that most of them are distinctly unfindable, except by direct recommendation or fluke. In that sense, “publishing” them by uploading them to Amazon and jumping…

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Blurb your enthusiasm

Here’s an interesting opportunity to acquire a new book in a new way from its author, Kevin Brennan.

WHAT THE HELL

Cover cropFascination is a curious little book, and I wouldn’t want you to buy a copy without knowing what you’re getting yourself into. It’s part picaresque, part morality play, and it covers plenty of territory across our great land. Route 66 looks like a cul de sac compared to the voyage of our heroes, Sally and Clive.

Stay tuned for a sample of the book tomorrow, and you’ll be able to land your own personalized copy on Monday.

Meanwhile:

Fascination!

It’s a road picture (with pictures)…

It’s the novel you buy straight from the author …

It’s a novel about self-realization and vengeance …

It’s a novel about the pointless journey of a grieving young widow — Sally Pavlou — and a lovestruck private investigator — Clive Bridle — looking for the dead man who done Sally wrong …

It’s a novel about postponing the inevitable and rushing to…

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