Mark Coker

Our Golden Age?

The early decades of the twenty-first century saw a great flowering of the literary arts, due in large part to the advent of self-publishing on the Internet. The writers called themselves Indie Authors. Many of them were members of the so-called Baby Boom generation, born between the end of the Second World War and the nineteen-sixties. With a high degree of literacy and egos inflated by the conviction that they were the first humans to experience anything worthwhile, many of them used their retirement years to write. Literary agents and publishers were overwhelmed by a flood of submissions from these eager wannabees. Mail rooms overflowed with manuscript boxes, fat brown envelopes and SASEs. Rejections issued forth, provoking incredulous disappointment. Technology came to the rescue, providing online publishing platforms that allowed the indies to elbow the weary gatekeepers aside and publish. Millions of ebooks and POD print books issued forth. Savvy entrepreneurs stepped up to provide services to the indies. Blogs multiplied and online literary salons proliferated.

Every now and then, I wonder what future scholars of literature might say about us indie author/publishers. The mainstream of traditional publishing gets lots of attention, but over the past decade, vast numbers of writers have been quietly publishing, blogging, debating, opining, reviewing, interviewing, and ultimately creating a Thing.

Will anyone, in the future, study, write about, and analyze our Thing? What will they call us? The Early 21st Century Indies? The Tsunami of Crap? Boomers Unbound?

Really, though, think about it: we create, we connect, we write and publish. We’re serious and sincere. Aside from the fact that most of this activity is carried on via the internet, there isn’t much difference between the current phenom and the literary movements of history. Salons, pamphlets, feuilletons, little magazines, and literary societies all have their online equivalents. This blog on which I’m holding forth right now continues the tradition of writers and thinkers using whatever means are at hand to share their thoughts.

Who knows what posterity will make of us? We may represent only the very beginning of a larger phenomenon. Or we may be a brief spark that vanishes into the current of history. Will our works be curated and preserved, or will their survival depend on pure accident amid some global catastrophe? To us, right now, it really doesn’t matter. The true value of the indie author movement to us indie authors is the connections we’ve made with one another by creating and sharing our works and ideas.

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Let’s keep on creating our Thing, whatever it is!

hammer and anvil

 

Book & Brains image created with Canva

Hammer and anvil image courtesy of Pixabay

The Indie Author Manifesto by Mark Coker at Smashwords

 

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Free Book Marketing Guide

A new edition of Mark Coker’s Smashwords Book Marketing Guide (ebook), with 65 book marketing ideas, is now available as a free download at these outlets:

Amazon
Barnes & Noble
iBooks
Kobo
Smashwords

More information at the Smashwords Blog.

Smashwords logo

Smashwords Survey 2017

Once again, Smashwords CEO Mark Coker has crunched the numbers and shared them with indie authors.

Find the complete results here.

 

And get ready to go ebook bargain hunting. The Smashwords Summer/Winter Sale starts July 1st!

Smashwords Summer/Winter Sale 2016

Books 2, 3 and 4 of the Herbert West Series will be available at half price.

Smashwords Summer/Winter Sale starts July 1st!

Every July, Smashwords authors have the opportunity to offer their ebooks at reduced prices (or free) at the Smashwords store. As Smashwords founder and CEO Mark Coker says, “Think of it as a massive co-marketing collaboration where thousands of authors work in parallel to introduce readers to thousands of awesome indie ebooks.”

For readers, it’s an opportunity to discover new authors or catch up with favourites. Whether you’re reading on the deck (northern hemisphere) or in front of the fire (southern), don’t miss this chance! Start browsing here.

While you’re there, you may wish to have a look at the Herbert West Series.

The Herbert West Series_final

 

A Manifesto!

Mark Coker of Smashwords has created a manifesto for indie authors. While one should be cautious of things calling themselves manifestos, this one is hard to resist if you’ve ever slogged through the submissions process and found an antidote to it in publishing your own work.

Number 6 is my favourite. No more submission.

Writers — Don’t Submit, Publish!

I am not a big fan of the word “submit” when it refers to sending one’s writing to publishers with the hope of getting published. In fact, I wrote a blog post all about this antipathy.

Which is why I was happy to see this blog post by author Hugh Howey and this comment on it in Publisher’s Weekly by Smashwords founder Mark Coker.

These gentlemen cover the topic more than adequately, so I will add only that this is another reason for indie authors and those with the temerity and courage to bring forth their works to the world to take heart. Write! Publish!